TeamMates Mentoring Program

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Our Mission is to positively impact the world by inspiring youth to reach their full potential through mentoring.”

The TeamMates Mentoring Program was founded in 1991 by Tom & Nancy Osborne in an effort to provide support and encouragement to school aged youth. The goal of the program is to see youth graduate from high school and pursue post-secondary education. To reach this goal, youth meet one hour per week with a caring adult who serves as a mentor.

What is a Mentor? A mentor is someone who provides a young person with support, friendship, and a positive example. Mentors want to help young people reach their full potential.

How much time will it take? One Hour a Week. TeamMates asks that you make a commitment of meeting with your student for one hour a week in a school setting for a minimum of one year.

What do I do during mentor time? Spend time talking and listening or focus on academics. Take some time to have a little fun like playing a game. Share a hobby. Work on a puzzle. Help your mentee develop a resume or just surf the net!

Who are mentors? Members of Service Organizations, Local Businesses, Media, Civic Groups, Faith Based Organizations, Government Agencies, Retirees, Professional Associations and Those willing to Make the One Hour Difference!

If you would like to become a mentor at Becker, Cunningham, Highland,  Irving, Kingsley, Lou Henry, Lowell, Orange, Poyner, Bunger Middle, George Washington Carver Academy, East, Expo or West High, please complete the TeamMates Mentoring Application and mail it to Waterloo Community Schools, Attn: Strategic Partnerships Department, 1516 Washington Street, Waterloo, IA 50702 or fax it to (319) 433-1889.

For more information check out the, TeamMates Mentoring FlierTeamMates Mentoring Brochure (Waterloo) or go to www.teammates.org.

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TeamMates Mentoring and Social Media – Part 1
TeamMates has been getting up-to-speed with the social media world – Twitter, Pinterest, Facebook, a blog( http://teammatesmentoringprogram.wordpress.com)   So we wanted to make sure we were clear with our motivations for these social media outlets.

TeamMates wants to use social media to connect with our mentors and any adult who is interested in learning more about TeamMates. We hope to share news, upcoming events, activity ideas, mentoring tips, training reminders, inspiration, and anything else to pump others up about TeamMates and the things we have going on every day. We also want our mentors to engage and interact with us. Comment on posts, share your ideas, follow us, and hopefully learn something new. When you are posting and sharing remember:

  • Don’t give any identifying information about your mentee (including, but not limited to, name, pictures, address, parent’s name, school, phone number, email address). Safety is one of our core values and is something we are committed to.
  • Don’t post any pictures of your mentee.
  • Be cautious of the information you share. You have earned your mentee’s trust. Celebrate milestones with your mentee, not with the social media world. Remember to respect your mentee and honor your relationship with them.
  • Keep private any confidential information relating to the history of your mentee’s family, educational experiences, or other related items.

As you may notice, TeamMates posts pictures and information about mentee and mentor relationships. Before doing so, we talk with all parties involved and have specific forms that are signed and in place. We never share more than a first name. If you have a story you wish to tell, please contact your Chapter Coordinator – Ellen Vanderloo at vanderlooe@waterlooschools.org.

TeamMates Mentoring and Social Media – Part 2
Social networking has the potential to blur boundaries and raise questions of safety and appropriateness. For this reason, TeamMates has a Social Media Policy that says to not get involved in these sites, such as Facebook, MySpace, or Twitter, with your mentee. There are privacy issues that could be compromised if you are involved in social networking with your mentee.  You can connect with your mentee in many other ways and develop a mature and caring relationship without the use of social media.